Why your dog needs Taurine Dog Supplements

In 2012 there was an article in VitaHound titled: Taurine Supplements are Usually Required in Present Day Dog Diets. Yes, as far back at 2012 the word was out – no diet has adequate taurine to match the stress and inflammation that dogs dealing with. And why to dogs have inflammation and stress? That fact I have been diagnosing since 2005 by doing hair Tissue Mineral Analysis testing. Inflammation and stress are related to adrenal gland function, aldosterone production, sodium retention, loss of potassium, calcium, and magnesium, inadequate levels of choline, taurine, inositol, vitamin A and E. Basically inadequate availability of whole food minerals, vitamins, and amino acids.

Other factors that can influence this includes:

  • Glyphosate – commonly known as Roundup – blocks and binds minerals from being available to the body. Even if it is in the food it may not get to the cells.
  • Herbicides and pesticides can leach calcium out of the cells.
  • Processed foods – the protein is no longer real meat. It has been treated so that the quality content of what was meat is not the same. The body does not digest it as it would unprocessed protein. And meat is a major source of taurine.
  • Toxins in the environment getting into the body can interfere with metabolism.
  • Busy lives, upset routines, mental stress

Facts about the benefits of taurine are:

It is one of the most plentiful amino acids in the body and thus provides many benefits. Potassium is an important mineral needed by the body for balancing acids, nerve impulse transmission, and enzymatic reactions. Taurine helps the cells to hold onto the needed potassium. Managing this in the tissues of the heart along with helping to control the heart beat makes it one of the most important amino acids in the heart.

It is also involved in the control of the release of neurotransmitters in the brain. This is believed to help prevent epileptic seizures. By helping to control cholesterol in the bile it is very effective in averting gall stones. Also being very high in white blood cells it promotes a proper immune system.

Taurine is found naturally in milk, meat, fish, eggs, and sea vegetables such as kelp and seaweed. As for meat (not meat meal or by-products) mice have three times more taurine than chicken, next highest beef, followed distantly by lamb. Kelp is a good supplement source since it contains all 21 amino acids and is also rich in minerals and many vitamins. Adding the needed taurine to your dog’s diet is reasonably safe with a natural supplement. Dosages range from 200mg to 2000mg per day best taken 2 to 3 times a day.

The Human-Animal Connection

REFLECTIONS FROM A VETERINARIAN

What is it about animals that make us feel good when we are in their space?
How do they bring out the best in us? How do they improve our health and overall well-being?

There are all kinds of research studies proving the rewards of human animal connections. But even those who do not read know this to be true. It is a feeling they emanate of wanting us, kindred spirits, sharing souls, the look from those eyes, that pulls us in and warms our hearts. It is what and how we feel when we are with them.

At the age of three I already knew my purpose in life was to be an animal doc- tor. Growing up on a farm in Missouri I spent many hours in the barn with the cats and kittens. Watching their behav- ior, mostly for the goal of being better able to catch them! Then there were the cows and calves, sows and piglets, horses, chickens, and later a funny goat. (Oh yeah that’s right, all goats are funny.) We generally had a dog or two, some indoors, some not. That’s the farm life I suppose.

With each encounter and time spent with the animals I learned by observing, yet grew by feeling. Those feelings, or emo- tions, were related to some kind of com- munication, received and perceived.

That communication was sometimes translated into; “She likes me” or “I need you too” or “thank you for that” and the occasional “I’ve had enough now.”

This becomes more accurate as we learn the communicating signals a specific spe-cies uses. Animals are much more in tune to all facets of body language be- cause, different than humans, they do not exist by our extensive use of verbal communication. Animal signals can be the eye; changes in shape and size of the pupil, position of ears, nose, lips, swish- ing of the tail, erection of feathers or fur, body contour to exhibit definition of size or intent, an odor, showing of teeth, or dancing for joy.” Click here to read the entire article.