Any advice for a dog who is terrified to ride in the car?

Any advice for a dog who is terrified to ride in the car?

There are many reasons why a dog might be terrified to ride in a car. First, and a common reason, is that they get carsick. Another is the fast motion of things passing by; cars, trees, houses, etc. Then there are unfamiliar external noises and a fourth reason can be, nowhere to hide.

You can first resolve the last possibility by trying a crate. Especially for those who regularly use a crate in daily life, this may solve it. Also check whether having it covered or open makes a difference. And slide that sun roof shade closed.

If that doesn’t fix it, then you are in for several weeks of deprogramming. This is done on a gradient and you must be patient and do all of the steps. Omitting some and jumping ahead could set you back and then a second attempt may not achieve the resolution.

STEP 1:

You + dog go sit in the back seat of the car. Start with only 5 minutes or at least quit before any fear signs start. This is one-on-one interaction. Visiting, brushing, petting, giving snacks… This first go-round may be less productive than hoped because of what they expect to happen. Do this daily or at least every other day until pooch shows no concerns and is actually happy to be there.  Could be days or could be weeks. Increase the length of time spent in the car, up to 20 minutes. Longer if you feel necessary.

STEP 2:

Mastering Step 1 we are now ready to turn on the engine. Get in car as in Step 1 for a few minutes. Then start the car and return to the back seat for the same as done before. Continue this daily to every other day gradually increasing the time spent in the car until they are not concerned and somewhat relaxed about the whole scene. DO NOT use your high-pitched sympathy voice in an effort to calm them. Use a confident assured tone that you are in charge and all is going to be fine.

STEP 3:

Same as Step 2 but after a few minutes in back seat you now move to the front seat, leaving the pooch alone where ever the riding position is going to be. If needed, repeat the same comforting phrases you found in Steps 1 and 2. Otherwise, have a conversation that will serve as a distraction. If this is not going well then back up and continue Step 2 a bit longer.

STEP 4:

Now you will have everything set up as in Step 3 except that you will put the car in gear and move in and out of the driveway. But not leaving the driveway. Just reverse then forward.  Wait a bit sitting there with engine on, then repeat. Figure out what is the right gradient for this. Continue for days or weeks until it is “no big deal.”

STEP 5:

Around the block!  Do not go too far. Make it a very short distance. Go, come home, get out, done. Repeat for days to weeks.

STEP 6:

Around the block. Stop and get out for a bit. Do something fun. Keep it short. Get back in car and go home.

STEP 7:

Gradually over time increase the distance gone, places visited, treats given, whatever your pooch believes made the car ride worthwhile. Including praise and hugs. Lots of them!

Happy traveling!!

Join Dr. Ava Frick at the Dog Anxiety Summit!

Join Me at the Dog Anxiety Summit!

A recent study of 13,700 dogs in Finland found that up to 70% of dogs show signs of anxiety!

But that’s not the scary part… The scary part is that most pet owners miss these signs.

Aggression.

Urinating or defecating in the house.

Drooling.

Panting.

Destructive behavior.

Depression.

Excessive barking.

Pacing…

…could all mean that your dog has serious anxiety issues that need to be looked at immediately or it could wreak havoc on the rest of their health.

Fortunately, Integrative Veterinarian, Dr. Edward Bassingthwaighte has partnered with Pet Summits to bring you the very first Dog Anxiety Summit. It’s completely online and free from September 2 to 7.

Dr. Edward has brought together 21+ world-leading veterinarians, dog trainers, and anxiety experts.

They’ll dive deep into what is causing your dog’s anxiety and how you can overcome it using natural and holistic solutions! You won’t want to miss this free event!

This summit is designed for pet owners who are looking for ways to help their dogs live happier, calmer and stress-free lives.

You can get started right now by registering here!

The line-up of incredible speakers at this summit includes Dr. Ava Frick, Laurie Edge Hughes, Dr. Jeff Feinman, Dr. Ian Dunbar, Dr. Theresa Welch Fossum, and many more.

It’s absolutely FREE for a limited time (September 2-7) plus it’s completely online so there’s nothing stopping you from joining!

You’ll get to mingle with a community of like-minded pet parents who are committed to improving their pets’ quality of life through better health and lifestyle choices.

We’re excited about what we can do together as we learn more about this important topic that affects our companion animals!

Click here now for registration information so you can join us at the Dog Anxiety Summit today!!!

Dr. Ava Frick featured on Your Natural Dog Podcast: Caring for Senior Dogs

Dr. Ava Frick on YND Podcast Episode 18: Caring for Senior Dogs

The lifestyle and diet that works for a puppy may not continue to work as your dog ages, but often we forget to make changes. In this episode, Dr. Ava Frick discusses the importance of paying attention to your dogs’ digestion, behavior, and mobility as they age. She also shares some common signs of aging and explains how planning and nutrition in the puppy stage can help your dog stay healthier in the future.

Episode Recap:

  • We often forget that dogs’ needs change as they age (0:45)
  • When is a dog considered a senior? (2:23)
  • Digestion changes as dogs age (5:24)
  • Look for behavior changes as your dog ages (9:49)
  • Pay attention to your dog’s mobility, it’s essential to quality of life (12:59)
  • Conventional pain regulation can make things worse for older dogs (20:20)
  • How to connect with Dr. Frick (22:21)

Join me for The Senior Dog Care Summit {REPLAY}

We’re excited to announce that the Senior Dog Care Summit, hosted by Dr. Ava Frick, is open again this coming weekend for an entire 48 hour replay.

In case you missed it, for the first time ever, Dr. Ava Frick has brought all of her colleagues together in order to share what really works when it comes to adding years to your dog’s life and reversing any age-related health ailments

It’s called the Senior Dog Care Summit and they will share with you step-by-step, practical and actionable senior dog health care solutions you need to give them a better quality of life… for FREE (for a limited time).

You can get started right now by registering here! ⇐=

The line-up of incredible speakers at this summit includes Dr. Will Falconer, Dr. Odette Suter, Dr. Katie Woodley, Dr. Susan Wagner, Dr. Chris Bessent, and many more.

The encore weekend is absolutely FREE for a limited time (April 16 – 17) plus it’s completely online so there’s nothing stopping you from joining!

You’ll get to mingle with a community of like-minded dog owners who are committed to improving their senior dogs’ quality of life too.

It’s time to solve the unprecedented rate of disease in our senior dogs and this could be the answer!

Click here now for registration information so you can join us at the Senior Dog Care Summit today!!! ⇐=

Can a harness help my senior dog?

Can a harness help my senior dog?

Can a harness hurt your dog? Check out Dr. Ava Frick’s video on how it can effect your dog:

What are the benefits of a good fitted harness for dogs? Dr. Ava Frick’s talks about the how it can help your senior dog:

Join me for The Senior Dog Care Summit (FREE Online Event!)

For the first time ever, Dr. Ava Frick has brought all of her colleagues together in order to share what really works when it comes to adding years to your dog’s life and reversing any age-related health ailments

It’s called the Senior Dog Care Summit and they will share with you step-by-step, practical and actionable senior dog health care solutions you need to give them a better quality of life… for FREE (for a limited time).

You can get started right now by registering here!

The line-up of incredible speakers at this summit includes Dr. Odette Suter, Dr. Katie Woodley, Dr. Susan Wagner, Dr. Chris Bessent, and many more.

It’s absolutely FREE for a limited time (April 8 – 12) plus it’s completely online so there’s nothing stopping you from joining!

You’ll get to mingle with a community of like-minded dog owners who are committed to improving their senior dogs’ quality of life too.

It’s time to solve the unprecedented rate of disease in our senior dogs and this could be the answer!

Click here now for registration information so you can join us at the Senior Dog Care Summit today!!!

Happy Tails!
Dr. Ava Frick

Join me for The Senior Dog Care Summit (FREE Online Event!)

Join me for The Senior Dog Care Summit (FREE Online Event!)

As our dogs get older they often suffer chronic health conditions that make the end of their life a struggle and painful.

The most frequent causes of death in our beloved dogs are cancer and kidney disease. In addition, 80-90% of senior dogs suffer from arthritis.

Early signs that your senior dog may be very in pain or struggling include disorientation, preferring to be left alone, avoiding activity, dull coat, loss of housetraining habits, wandering at night, and poor appetite.

These symptoms could also be indicators of heart disease, kidney disease, or liver disease.

Unfortunately, this is common-place in the pet industry today! And we believe there is a better solution.

That’s why we’re excited to announce that Dr. Ava Frick, one of the world’s most renowned Integrative Veterinarians has partnered with Pet Summits to bring you the very first Senior Dog Care Summit. It’s completely free and online from April 8 – 12.

Dr. Frick has practiced for 24 years in animal chiropractic, rehab and nutrition. Her research and books in the fields of equine exercise, hair tissue mineral analysis, nutrition, and veterinary microcurrent therapy (to which she is considered the world’s leading authority) have been internationally published.

She has been honored as Hartz Veterinarian of the Year Runner-up, received a humane society Visionary Award, and was one of the first inductees into the Animal Chiropractic Hall of Fame.

Over the year’s she has helped thousands of animals recover from health issues and diseases they were told they could never recover from.

For the first time ever, Dr. Ava Frick has brought all of her colleagues together in order to share what really works when it comes to adding years to your dog’s life and reversing any age-related health ailments

It’s called the Senior Dog Care Summit and they will share with you step-by-step, practical and actionable senior dog health care solutions you need to give them a better quality of life… for FREE (for a limited time).

You can get started right now by registering here!

The line-up of incredible speakers at this summit includes Dr. Odette Suter, Dr. Katie Woodley, Dr. Susan Wagner, Dr. Chris Bessent, and many more.

It’s absolutely FREE for a limited time (April 8 – 12) plus it’s completely online so there’s nothing stopping you from joining!

You’ll get to mingle with a community of like-minded dog owners who are committed to improving their senior dogs’ quality of life too.

It’s time to solve the unprecedented rate of disease in our senior dogs and this could be the answer!

Click here now for registration information so you can join us at the Senior Dog Care Summit today!!!

Happy Tails!
Dr. Ava Frick

Upcoming Seminar – Building a Nutrition Practice

Clinical Animal Nutrition

Presented by: Dr. Ava Frick, DVM
Saturday, June 9, 2012

Applied for 8 hours of DVM, VMD & CVT
Continuing Education in all New England States

Dr. Frick will cover topics such as:

Annual Nutrition Examinations
-­ How to make it work!

What Our Pets Eat
-­ Archetype diet vs. Processed diet

Food Synergy
-­ The Key to Whole Food Nutrition

Using a Clinical Animal Nutrition (CAN) Survey

Diagnostic Tests & Case Examples

And More!!!

Event Details:

Saturday, June 9, 2012 8:30am -­ 5:30pm
Registration begins at 8:00am -­ Buffet lunch included

Sheraton Boston Colonial North
One Audubon Rd Wakefield, MA 01880 781-245-9300

Mention Standard Process for $99 room rate until 5/25/12

Tuition
Health Care Professional  –  $99
Students/Staff/Spouse  –  $79

Register Online and receive $10 off: www.NewEnglandSeminars.com

The Human-Animal Connection

REFLECTIONS FROM A VETERINARIAN

What is it about animals that make us feel good when we are in their space?
How do they bring out the best in us? How do they improve our health and overall well-being?

There are all kinds of research studies proving the rewards of human animal connections. But even those who do not read know this to be true. It is a feeling they emanate of wanting us, kindred spirits, sharing souls, the look from those eyes, that pulls us in and warms our hearts. It is what and how we feel when we are with them.

At the age of three I already knew my purpose in life was to be an animal doc- tor. Growing up on a farm in Missouri I spent many hours in the barn with the cats and kittens. Watching their behav- ior, mostly for the goal of being better able to catch them! Then there were the cows and calves, sows and piglets, horses, chickens, and later a funny goat. (Oh yeah that’s right, all goats are funny.) We generally had a dog or two, some indoors, some not. That’s the farm life I suppose.

With each encounter and time spent with the animals I learned by observing, yet grew by feeling. Those feelings, or emo- tions, were related to some kind of com- munication, received and perceived.

That communication was sometimes translated into; “She likes me” or “I need you too” or “thank you for that” and the occasional “I’ve had enough now.”

This becomes more accurate as we learn the communicating signals a specific spe-cies uses. Animals are much more in tune to all facets of body language be- cause, different than humans, they do not exist by our extensive use of verbal communication. Animal signals can be the eye; changes in shape and size of the pupil, position of ears, nose, lips, swish- ing of the tail, erection of feathers or fur, body contour to exhibit definition of size or intent, an odor, showing of teeth, or dancing for joy.” Click here to read the entire article.

Human-Animal Bond and Animals in Therapy

The impact of animals on our lives transcends the eons of our existence. Today it is common to show affection and love for the animals with which we communicate. A growing body of research currently documents the significance of the human- animal bond (H-AB) in child development, elderly care, mental illness, physical impairment, dementia, abuse and trauma recovery, as well as the rehabilitation of those in prisons. One can also not overlook the enormous value of canine assisted therapy for our wounded warriors. 1,2

National and interna-tional conferences first
brought attention to the
H-AB in the 1970s and
1980s, along with media coverage of community animal-assisted programs such as a dog obedience club giving an obedience demonstration at a residential facility for teenagers with delinquent behavior and school or hospice pet visitation. Others highlighted included therapy such as therapeutic horsemanship, and service dog training programs. The Delta Society encouraged research in this area, with the majority of funding coming from companies within the pet industry. Now H-AB has its focus on the importance of human- animal interactions to human health and well-being. Click here to read the entire article.

Tissue Mineral Analysis Patterns in 564 Dogs

Abstract

Tissue Mineral Analysis (TMA) is a technique using soft tissue hair or fur biopsy that provides a reading of the mineral deposition in the cells and interstitial spaces of the hair over a 2 to 3 month period. TMA can be used to understand metabolism. It is another scientific measure that can expand our understanding of health and processes that impact illness in dogs. Mineral excess or deficiency is known to produce certain physical and psychological symptoms.
The correlation of TMA results with clinical signs seen in patients is discussed in this paper.

Tissue mineral levels and electrolyte patterns of calcium(Ca), magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), and potassium (K) were analyzed in 564 dogs (300 male, 264 female; 99% neutered or spayed) of variable breeds. Their ages ranged from 1 to 15 years. Cases included all dogs presented to the
authors within a 12-year period. Click here to read the entire article.