Gus, the dog, in 50 states

Featured Pet of the Month:

Meet Gus, who is on a mission to play fetch in all 50 states! Before and after his excursions Gus checks in with Dr. Ava Frick at Animal Rehab St. Louis for function, mobility and nutrition.

Treating the horses at Ride On St. Louis

Thank you Ride on St. Louis for writing this great article about my services! We love helping your horses so they can help achieve your mission of sharing love, strength, and joy.

Ride on St. Louis wrote:

Dr. Ava Frick, DVM, CVC, FAIS, a pioneer in the field of animal rehabilitation Dr. Frick earned her veterinary degree in 1980, a certification in Animal Chiropractic in 1997 and a proficiency certification in Herbal Phytotherapy in 2006. Her focus on physiotherapy has spanned almost 20 years and was a pioneer in the field of animal rehabilitation. Dr. Frick is recognized as the world’s leading veterinary authority in the application of micro-current therapy for animals.

Dr. Frick recently visited our herd and has been treating the horses at Ride On St. Louis to support their movement, conformation, musculoskeletal function, neurological activity and overall health through chiropractic bodywork and nutrition. Horses experiencing altered nerve function and nonalignment may experience problems such as pain, abnormal posture, lameness, overloading of leg joints and muscle strain. Ensuring that our horses receive chiropractic attention decreases canceled programs due to injury/discomfort, increases benefits for clients and participants, prevents damage and veterinarian expense, and provides the care and attention that our special horses deserve to stay fit and comfortable throughout all life stages.

We are thankful for Dr. Frick’s expertise and her generosity in donating many products and services throughout the years. Dr. Frick’s visits are made possible through the competitive equine welfare grant seeking efforts of Ride On St. Louis.

Dog Pain

THE 25 SIGNS THAT ARE ‘SUFFICIENT’ INDICATORS OF PAIN IN DOGS
This list is an assessment tool which covers the sensorial and emotional aspects of pain.

Being able to identify a set of behaviors can help to reliably detect pain. For each of these signs, they are frequently present in both low and high levels of pain.

PUT AN “X” IN THE BOXES THAT APPLY TO YOUR DOG
X
1. Lameness, abnormal gait
2. Difficulty in jumping or moving in a certain way or direction, unable to do stairs
3. Legs splayed out rather than under body
4. Reluctant to move, avoid situations that could elicit pain
5. Reaction to palpation, dislike or intolerance of handling
6. Withdrawn, hiding
7. Sleeping more
8. Playing less. Less interested in going for a walk
9. Licking inanimate objects (can often be a sign of intestinal pain)
10. Overall activity less than normal, moves slower
11. Change in mood, grumpy
12. Restlessness; pacing, getting up and down and adjusting position or place
13. Wobbly
14. Hunched back or sway back
15. Shifting weight off area of body
16. Licking excessively or rubbing a certain area of the body
17. Lower or tilted head, ears in unusual position
18. Temperamental, Yelp or growl when being petted or other animal comes near space
19. Change in form of feeding behavior, type of food preferred, avoiding or decreased appetite
20. Weeping, red, cloudy or squinting eyes
21. Looks depressed
22. Groaning, moaning, grunting
23. Heavy panting, increased heart rate when doing nothing (and it’s not hot!)
24. Hanging or tucked tail
25. Change in toileting habits e.g. not lifting leg, not squatting low, defecating in house drops out
© IVE, Inc. 2016

Cat Pain

THE 25 SIGNS THAT ARE ‘SUFFICIENT’ INDICATORS OF PAIN IN CATS
This list is an assessment tool which covers the sensorial and emotional aspects of pain.

Being able to identify a set of behaviors can help to reliably detect pain. For each of these signs, they are frequently present in both low and high levels of pain.

PUT AN “X” IN THE BOXES THAT APPLY TO YOUR CAT
X
1. Lameness
2. Difficulty in jumping
3. Abnormal gait
4. Reluctant to move
5. Reaction to palpation
6. Withdrawn, hiding
7. Absence of grooming
8. Playing less
9. Decreased appetite
10. Overall activity less than normal
11. Change in mood
12. Not rubbing on people or doing it less
13. Temperamental, hissing
14. Hunched up posture
15. Shifting weight off area of body
16. Licking excessively in certain area
17. Lower head position, ears pinned or not up right
18. Involuntary forced blinking
19. Change in form of feeding behavior, type of food preferred, avoiding
20. Avoiding areas of bright light
21. Growling
22. Groaning
23. Eyes closed
24. Tail flicking
25. Straining to urinate
© IVE, Inc. 2016